Browsing Tag

Health management

Alberto de Rosa, English

A new opportunity

1 julio, 2020 • By

We have been talking about this for many years. The post-COVID-19 reality means that it is now more necessary than ever to undergo reformations in the Health sector that will allow the system to be more flexible and provide it with the tools necessary to face health care crisis such as that we have just experienced. However, most researchers agree upon the fact that COVID-19 has been the first pandemic of the 21st century, but it will not be the last. First of all, we need to be prepared to coexist with this virus, at least until a vaccine is available on the market.

The great axes around which an urgent restructuring of the healthy system must pivot are, in my opinion: an increased Health budget, with total transparency; the introduction of reformations in the management of human resources and implementation of new organisational models, where digitalisation plays an essential role; the overcoming of barriers between levels of care, with greater integration in the social space; and the necessary involvement and collaboration of all resources in the system, both public and private.

Any type of reformation necessarily involves flexibilisation of the health system, the rigidity of which has been causing a lack of efficiency and loss of quality with regards to citizen care for decades. At a time when it is more important than ever to contribute, innovate and position ourselves one step ahead of any health care crisis that may threaten the population, the institutions must be brave and make effective decisions.

I have spoken about the necessary increase for the Health budget, of course, always from absolute transparency, prioritising resources and specifying items. But perhaps the most urgent challenge for a health system such as the Spanish one is the necessary reformation of the management of human resources, where, in my opinion, it would be advisable to redefine the legal framework in order to permit a more modern management of human resources and to introduce variable remuneration models and bonuses, in order to recognise the value provided by professionals at all times.

In the same way as the citizens have new needs with regards to the care for their well-being, I believe that it is essential to restructure the current medical specialties and to make decisions that permit an increase in the number of certain disciplines in order to adapt the offer to the demand for care. Spain is currently generating a large number of specialists that, as a consequence of the technological advances or the demographic profile of the citizens, are no longer necessary in these quantities. Even so, there is a lack of specialists in modalities where jobs for Resident Medical Interns (RMI) are not anticipated. This situation generates imbalances, rigidity in the system, low performance and, most importantly, a decrease in quality and care for citizens. Because if there is a lack of specialists, the waiting lists grow longer.

This COVID-19 crisis will imply an acceleration in the digital transformation process. It is fundamental to implement new organisational models to consolidate the general focus on digitalisation both for health care (with predictive models and online and offline care, useful healthcare websites, direct communication between the patient and their physician, promotion of home care and remote medicine, etc.) and for managing medicines (integrate complements for pharmacists in the care circuit, guarantee online prescriptions and a medicine cooperative, among others).

Another aspect to be learned from this health care crisis is that we must progress the citizen’s perspective as the protagonist of our system and overcome all barriers between the levels of care: primary care, hospital, nursing homes and specialised services. It is essential that we strengthen primary care, guarantee human resources and materials in order to offer personalised, approachable and quality care for our citizens.

It is urgent, after the devastating effect that COVID-19 has had on nursing homes, to reconsider the creation of a single socio-healthcare space in order to break the duality between Health and Social Well-being. Nursing homes must be added to the work areas that are currently integrated to the health departments.

Throughout this transformation, we must avail of all of the agents in the system, both public and private, because if there is something else that we’ve learned from this pandemic it’s that without working together and collaborating, it would have been much more difficult to provide an effective and quality response to our citizens.

I would like to dedicate this article to all of those who have lost their lives as a result of this pandemic.

(This article was published in New Medical Economics on 1sth July 2020)


Alberto de Rosa, English

The value of the local sphere

23 marzo, 2020 • By

It’s been one week since the government announced a state of alarm, and citizens and organisations are still struggling to adapt to these exceptional circumstances. We are all writing a line in the Story of managing this global pandemic, the first of the 21st century.

Every citizen plays their part in this situation: health professionals, pharmacists and researchers on front lines in the battle against the coronavirus; workers in basic services such as cleaning, transport, food and the security forces who help make sure that life doesn’t come to a complete halt. And our governments, each in their own area. The Central Government is trying to unify policies, collect daily information on the number of cases and give instructions and recommendations of a general nature, while regional governments, responsible for healthcare management in each territory, feed this chain of information, apply criteria coming from above and take the necessary decisions, transmitting them to the various healthcare management bodies.

I have no doubt that we’re all working along the same lines, towards maximum collaboration between institutions, with the belief that we will all win this battle together.

However, I believe that there is one player fundamental to this crisis, because of its importance as an agent of the health system and its closeness to citizens. I’m talking about city and town councils. In situations like this, the importance of municipal social services and their contact with the elderly and the most vulnerable groups at risk of exclusion, or the local police, essential to guaranteeing social isolation, is a reality that we should value at a time of maximum social tension, due to the circumstances we are facing and those that are still to come. 

And let’s not just think about the councils in big cities. The smaller the population, the more important the role of the local government due to its direct contact with citizens; they turn to it to raise doubts and concerns, and request services. These smaller municipalities often don’t have the possibility of using teleworking, which is why these public servants are also heroes during the crisis. 

At Ribera Salud we have always thought that one of our main missions as those responsible for our citizens’ healthcare is to work hand in hand with the community we serve. And to do so, there is no better formula than being fully integrated into the life of said community. We mutually support each other.

Regarding this, I am very proud as, right at the start of this health crisis, we launched an initiative to improve direct communication with local councils and to intensify coordination among all personnel. The heads of health departments managed by Ribera Salud have already held their first meetings with the mayors of all the municipalities in their areas via video conferencing. Councils as diverse as Torrevieja, Pilar de la Horadada, Orihuela, Elche, Aspe, Crevillente, Torrejón, Daganzo, and Ajalvir, among others, have participated in these coordination calls. And I would like to thank all the participating mayors for their commitment, enthusiasm and collaboration, as well as the enormous support they’ve given us over these past few days.

In these meetings, I can see four principles that I consider fundamental to healthcare management in the 21st century:

Communication between all the institutions, with the objective of always having an open channel for a quick response to an occurrence.

Transparency in explaining why decisions were made and receiving any suggestions that could help us improve and adapt to a constantly changing scenario.

Proximity, as local administrations and health departments have a higher degree of contact with citizens and are a very good source for attending to doubts and transmitting suggestions.

Coordination, because I think it is highly important that local police know the strategies of hospitals or how primary care is working first-hand, and that social services know they can receive training and information to do their job with maximum safety guarantees.

We’re all one. Each of Spain’s 8,131 city and town councils aims to work towards the general interest. For Ribera Salud, the importance of being integrated into the community where we serve goes beyond words. With these meetings we demonstrate the value of the local sphere in the global strategies of any institution or organisation through a very concrete action. Every link in the chain is important and we will continue to work along these lines. Now and forever.


English

Tripping twice (or a thousand times) on the same stone

26 febrero, 2020 • By

I have spoken several times on this blog about waiting lists, and this time I want to start with public recognition of the transparency exercise undertaken by the Generalitat. Even when the data isn’t good, there is no doubt that transparency is essential in a mature society that aspires to progress. Unlike many, I like to recognise and appreciate other people’s work when they do things right.

The publication of the waiting lists by department may have generated a certain level of controversy and debate, but these advances in transparency by the public institutions are fundamental in order to search for solutions to the problems: just like in Healthcare, when there is a clear diagnosis, the correct treatment can be applied. If you cheat at Solitaire, you’ll always be deceived.

The information made public by the Conselleria de Sanidad (Department of Health) has allowed us to learn that there are hospitals with an average waiting list of five months (154 and 140 days). And given that the average is almost half a year, that means that there are people who wait a year or more… something which is incomprehensible in the year 2020. The average waiting time in the Community of Valencia is 86 days, which is a slightly better figure in comparison to last year, which shows that, beyond the inefficient government policies, the professionals are always committed to offering good healthcare to the citizens. For them to have the necessary tools is another story. As the regional secretary stated at an appearance, “operations don’t take place in the offices, they take place in the operating theatres”. I couldn’t agree more.

However, beyond these general details, there are two points that I would like to highlight. The data provided by the Department of Health clearly reflects that the concession model significantly contributes towards the reduction of average waiting times, with tremendously favourable and positive data. I have read some comments that question these figures, coming from people that I have not seen in my day-to-day work in healthcare management during 30 years of experience in the sector, ladies and gentlemen that have never asked or learned about the reality of healthcare offered by the public-private collaboration model. In politics, as in almost all scopes of life, we must first learn the reality in order to later have a valid opinion and not just talk about what we’ve heard or follow scripts, which, by the way, are written by more people who have never seen the reality of what they are now discussing as though they are authorities on the subject.

These types of people are the ones who believe that the best way to hide the failure of their management is to question the success of others. Mediocracy is a way of life for some. What a shame.

Well, let me tell you that the Department of Health itself recognises, in this publication of waiting lists by health department, that the Ribera Salud hospitals are positioned among the top three in the Community of Valencia. That is to say, at our hospitals, citizens wait for half the amount of time than the average in hospitals in our region and up to four times less than the longest waiting lists. The numbers are stubborn.

There is another point of information that must be highlighted and that is interesting to analyse in this scope of Healthcare: the decreased quality of care at Hospital de la Ribera just 20 months after the Department of Health took over direct management. The waiting lists have moved from 57 to 78 days in less than two years, and those who wait for longer than 90 days have tripled in number, despite having hired almost 900 people. And this is only just getting started, despite the commendable work that I know the professionals at La Ribera are carrying out. The fact that something (or many things) are failing is evident.

I know that some people find it difficult to understand that it is important to have an open mind in order to seek new formulas that can help us, as a society, to improve the healthcare system and, above all, to make it sustainable over time. We must be flexible. And brave. To publish the waiting lists by department might be the first step, but bravery is necessary in order to make decisions.

If there are many indicators that clearly describe a situation, the problem is not the data but rather the underlying cause behind the data. I understand that I can get repetitive about these types of analyses, but it is necessary because sometimes we are forced to undertake positive pedagogy. When we talk about waiting lists, we’re not talking about numbers but about people.

This leads me to the appearance by the regional secretary of healthcare technology and efficiency, Concha Andrés, on February 10th, where the solution she suggested for current waiting lists was to send patients to hospitals with shorter waiting times. Given that she has not contacted either of the Ribera Salud hospitals, both positioned among the three hospitals with the shortest waiting times, I will take this opportunity to offer the healthcare clinics in our group to help them to improve the waiting times for patients in the Community of Valencia.

Cataracts, bunions, hernias and whatever is required in Traumatology, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology or General Surgery. I’m sure that may of these ailments with the longest waiting lists are suffered by older patients, and we cannot allow political prejudice to have a negative impact on those who deserve our utmost respect for everything they have contributed, and continue to contribute, to our society.

For this reason and for the good of all of our citizens, I will never stop trying to be constructive and positive and trying to build bridges and collaborations with the public administration, always in favour of quality, efficient and sustainable healthcare.


English

The story of Alzira in two speeches

3 mayo, 2018 • By

It´s been a month since the Valencian government took over the management of La Ribera Health Department. After almost 20 years of private management, on 1st April, La Ribera began a new stage of direct public management. There are many conclusions to be made about the whole situation, which I will discuss in future blog entries.READ MORE


English

How much longer do I have to wait?

3 julio, 2017 • By

The latest regional data collected by the Government shows that surgery waiting times have increased again within the Spanish National Health Service (SNS) and, once again, I am regret to see that the SNS surgery waiting list has again become catastrophic.

According to the latest figures published last week by the Ministry of Health, the average waiting time to undergo surgery within the SNS has reached 115 days compared to 83 days just six months ago. If we compare this among autonomous communities, the differences between some communities and others are huge, ranging from 182 days in the Canary Islands and 173 in Catalonia, to 115 in the Valencian Community, 50 days in the Basque Country, 49 in La Rioja, and 33 and 39 in Melilla and Ceuta, respectively. READ MORE